Linking great ape conservation and poverty alleviation in DRC 2014

21st - 22nd of May 2014, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC)

Great apes are iconic species that are highly valued by the international community and are a high priority for various international conservation efforts. At the same time, great ape ranges coincide with some of the poorest countries of the world. Many ape conservation organisations have been addressing poverty issues, but the results have been mixed, and experiences and lessons learnt are rarely shared amongst organisations. To improve how successfully we address great ape conservation-poverty linkages we need better understanding of the issues at stake, and increased integration between all the actors involved (conservation and development organisations, research institutes, private sector and government).

In response to these concerns IIED, with funding from UK aid and Arcus Foundation, organised a two day workshop in May 2014 in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), which brought together people working on conservation and development issues in DRC, with a focus on the conservation of great apes.

The objectives of this meeting were:

  • To provide a space to DRC based conservation and/or development organisations where they can share their practical experiences in linking ape conservation and poverty alleviation, particularly reflecting on what has worked, what hasn’t and why
  • To understand to what extent ape conservation and poverty are linked in official DRC conservation and development policy
  • To identify what needs to change - from specific practices to national policies - in order to maximise conservation-poverty linkages
  • To develop practical proposals for how these changes might be brought about, and what role a network of conservation and development organisations in DRC could play (for example through information exchange, learning and joint action)

The workshop revolved around a number of distinct themes and topics. Day One mainly focused on learning from each other, with a series of project level presentations made. On Day two, participants explored relevant national processes relating to poverty and conservation and developed a way forward for advancing the learning into the future.

 

Workshop Documents:

A background note and meeting agenda. (English) (French)

'Linking great ape conservation and poverty alleviation in DRC' meeting report. (English) (French)

 

Workshop Presentations:

Introduction to the meeting: Structure, main objectives and expected outcomes (English) (French)

Josephine HEAD, consultant for the International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED)

 

Session 1 -  Linking Conservation and Poverty Alleviation: Experiences from the field part one

Conservation and Development: The case of the Bonobo Conservation Initiative
Evelyne SAMU, Bonobo Conservation Initiative (BCI)

Conservation and Development in the TL2 landscape: dealing with socioeconomic constraints
John HART, Lukuru Foundation

IGCP experience on great apes conservation and poverty alleviation
Altor MUSEMA, International Gorilla Conservation Programme (IGCP)

The revision of DRC’s NBSAP : opportunities and challenges for organisations working on great ape conservation and poverty alleviation
Mike IPANGA, Ministère de l'Environnement, Conservation de la Nature et Tourisme Direction du Développement Durable (DDD/MECNT)

AWF’s experience on linking great apes conservation and poverty alleviation in DRC
Charly FACHEUX, African Wildlife Foundation (AWF)

 

Session 2 - Linking Conservation and Poverty Alleviation: Experiences from the field part 2

Alternatives livelihoods activities in the case of Maringa / Lopori-Wamba
Jean Louis SANDJA, Centre de Développement Agro – Pastoral de Djolu (CEDAP)

Gorilla Conservation in Eastern Congo, The Holistic approach of the Gorilla Organization
Henry CIRHUZA, The Gorilla Organisation

A One Health Approach to Great Ape Conservation
Jacques IYANYA, Gorilla Doctors

FFI’s experience on linking great apes conservation and poverty alleviation in DRC
Eulalie BASHIGE, Fauna and Flora International (FFI)

 

Session 3 – National level conservation and development processes

Poverty-conservation policy context in DRC - to what extent are ape conservation and poverty linked in official DRC conservation and development policy?
Jean Joseph MAPILANGA, Institut Congolais pour la Conservation de la Nature (ICCN)

REDD+ : opportunities and challenges for organisations working on great ape conservation and poverty alleviation
Hassan ASSANI ONGALA, National REDD+ Coordination (CN-REDD+)

Basic Necessities Surveys to monitor changes in locally-defined poverty indicators and Governance monitoring
Michelle WIELAND, Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS)

 

Session 4 – Challenges and successes of cooperation and information sharing practices in DRC

Measuring the success of changing attitudes and behaviour
Cynthia MOSES, International Conservation and Education Fund (INCEF)

Issues of policy and governance to conservation in DRC, challenges to communication
Toussaint MOLENGE, IUCN Consultant

Governance, conservation and the fight against climate change: Challenges and opportunities for IUCN in DRC
Brigitte KAPINGA, IUCN

The experience of the poverty and conservation learning group in Cameroon
Antoine EYEBE, U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID)

Central Africa Regional Program for the Environment (CARPE): a focus on wildlife trafficking, great ape conservation and livelihoods
Antoine EYEBE, U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID)

About us

The Poverty and Conservation Learning Group is an international network of organisations that promotes learning on the linkages between biodiversity conservation and poverty reduction.

More about us

IIED The Poverty and Conservation Learning Group is a project coordinated by IIED.

UK AidArcus foundation

This website is funded by UK aid and the Arcus Foundation. The views expressed on this site do not necessarily reflect the views of these organisations.

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