Kalinga Mission for Indigenous Children and Youth Development (KAMICYDI)

Kalinga Mission for Indigenous Communities and Youth Development, Inc. (KAMICYDI) is an indigenous peoples organisation (IPO) organized by active students and professionals. Since its start, in 1984, KAMICYDI has contributed to poverty reduction, biodiversity conservation and in ensuring a sustainable future for Kalinga Indigenous Peoples.

Projects

1. Sustainable Indigenous Peoples Agricultural Technology (SIPAT): This project is based on an indigenous best practice that integrates forest, watershed, indigenous communal irrigation systems, and rice terraces-fish-vegetable integration. SIPAT includes policy advocacy, local capacity building, conservation and promotion of productive traditional rice varieties, discovery and promotion of drought resilient rice varieties, sustainable organic vegetables, sustainable agro forestry, indigenous communal irrigation systems and sustainable rice-fish-vegetables farming. This is KAMICYDI?s primary initiative for poverty reduction, biodiversity conservation, climate change mitigation/adaptation, local capacity building, and achievement of MDGs targets in the local level.
2. Bio-Intensive Gardening (BIG): This particular project aims to increase farmers? vegetables production and improve their health by not using chemical fertilizers and pesticides in their own backyard. This also aims to increase soil fertility and stop air pollution caused by chemical fertilizers and pesticides.
3. Kalinga Integrated Rainforestation: This project aims to restore the rainforest by planting native species and endemic tree species. This also include grassland reforestation, as source of sustainable wood consumption for the local and indigenous communities, and Community-Managed Nursery, Children and Youth?s Managed Nursery & tree planting.
4. Community Knowledge Service (CKS): This is a local capacity building strategy that focuses on farmer-to-farmer, peer-to-peer and community-to-community knowledge learning and sharing. This is done both horizontally (within the local level) and vertically (within the national and international level).
5. Microfinance Program for Indigenous Women Entrepreneurs (MPIWE): This programme builds the capacity of enterprising Kalinga indigenous women by providing entrepreneurship and business planning training and provision of start-up capital for their environment friendly micro-enterprise businesses.
6. Young entrepreneurship Skills (YES) Program: This program builds the capacity of enterprising Kalinga indigenous children and youths by providing entrepreneurship and business planning training and provision of start-up capital for their environment friendly micro-enterprise businesses.
7. Sustainable Indigenous Peoples Environment Friendly Enterprise Development (SIPEFED): This programme builds the capacity of both Kalinga indigenous women and men by providing community arts and handicrafts training and provision of start-up capital for their environment friendly community arts and handicrafts micro-enterprise businesses as well as helping them in marketing.
8. Indigenous Community conserved Areas (ICCA): This project includes the promotion of ICCA and policy advocacy for the recognition of these existing protection mechanisms by the government locally, nationally and internationally.

Contacts
Type of organisation: 
Indigenous Peoples/Local Community Organisation
Location: 
Philippines
Contacts: 

Donato B. Bumacas
E-mail: don112768@yahoo.com, Phone: +639069003570


Kalinga Mission for Indigenous Children and Youth Development, Payawal Subd., San Lorenzo, Gapan City 3105, Philippines
Phone: +63 44 486 1053
E-mail: kmcydkalinga@yahoo.com

About us

The Poverty and Conservation Learning Group is an international network of organisations that promotes learning on the linkages between biodiversity conservation and poverty reduction.

More about us

IIED The Poverty and Conservation Learning Group is a project coordinated by IIED.

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This website has received funding from UK aid and the Arcus Foundation. The views expressed on this site do not necessarily reflect the views of these organisations.

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