Africa-Asia Ape Conservation and Poverty Alleviation Learning Exchange

11 - 15 January, 2012, Bogor, Indonesia

The Africa-Asia Ape Conservation and Poverty Alleviation Learning Exchange took place at CIFOR campus, Bogor, Indonesia.  The workshop focused on linking great ape/forest conservation and poverty alleviation and covered mechanisms such as reducing human wildlife conflict, encouraging ape-based tourism and investing in ape-friendly REDD+. The workshop was the second of a series on 'Great Apes and Poverty Linkages', organised by the Poverty and Conservation Learning Group (PCLG), and the International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED), with financial support from United States Fish and Wildlife (USFW), the United Stated Agency for International Development (USAID), the Arcus Foundation and the Great Apes Survival Partnership (GRASP). The event was hosted by CIFOR and the Forestry Research and Development Agency (FORDA) of Indonesia’s Ministry of Forestry.

Workshop Documents:

The workshop's agenda can be downloaded - Ape Conservation and Poverty Alleviation Workshop Agenda

The workshop report is available in both English & French - 

Further Documents:

CIFOR also produced an Info Brief on this topic - Linking great ape conservation and poverty alleviation. Sharing experiences from Africa and Asia

For more information about this event,  please visit CIFOR's  web page  for a full list of presentations, blogs, photos and videos from the workshop and field trip.

Workshop Presentations:

Introductions and scene setting

Overview of the Workshop

Fieldtrip Information

 

Theme 1: Can REDD+ deliver poverty and ape conservation benefits?

Linking REDD+ with ape conservation in Africa - opportunities and challenges
Terry Sunderland, Centre for International Forestry Research, Indonesia

Linking REDD+ with ape conservation in Asia - opportunities and challenges
Laura D'Arcy, London Zoological Society, UK

Economic incentives to conserve orangutan habitat
Johannes Refisch, UNEP GRASP, 

 

Theme 2: Can tourism deliver poverty and ape conservation benefits? 

Ape tourism and poverty in Africa - issues, themes and lessons
Dilys Roe, International Institute of Environment and Development

Ape tourism and poverty in Asia - issues, themes and lessons
Anne Russon, York University, UK

Case Study: Linking ape tourism and poverty in Uganda - opportunities, limitations and lessons learned
Akankwasah Barirega, Ministry of Tourism, Wildlife and Heritage, Uganda

Case Study: Linking ape tourism and poverty in Rwanda - opportunities, limitations and lessons learned
Antoine Mudakikwa, Rwanda Development Board / Tourism and Conservation, Rwanda

Case study: Linking ape tourism and poverty in Indonesia - opportunities, limitations and leassons learned
Bambang Supriyanto, Deputy Director for Program and Evaluation of Environmental Services, Ministry of Forestry, Indonesia

 

Theme 3: Addressing a constraint to better ape conservation - poverty linkages, dealing with Human-Wildlife Conflict

Human-wildlife conflict in Asia: its impact on ape conservation - poverty relationship and how to tackle it
Linda Yuliani, Centre for International Forestry Research, Indonesia

Tackling human-wildlife conflict in Africa in order to improve attitudes to ape conservation. Practical experience from Cameroon
Antoine Eyebe, CARPE

Tackling human-wildlife conflict in Africa in order to improve attitudes to ape conservation. Practica experience from Uganda
Panta Kasoma, The Jane Goodall Institute, Uganda

Practical experience of tackling human-wildlife conflict in Asia
Rondang Siregar

Stasiun pengamatan orangutan semi liar dan tantanganya
Ian Singleton, PanEco Foundation, Switzerland

Reintroduction des Gorilles Orphelins au Congo
Florent Ikoli, Congo

About us

The Poverty and Conservation Learning Group is an international network of organisations that promotes learning on the linkages between biodiversity conservation and poverty reduction.

More about us

IIED The Poverty and Conservation Learning Group is a project coordinated by IIED.

UK AidArcus foundation

This website has received funding from UK aid and the Arcus Foundation. The views expressed on this site do not necessarily reflect the views of these organisations.

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